Announced: Seahorse® is the T4U Successor

After the recent EIOPA announcement that the XBRL reporting tool T4U will be decommissioned next month, many filers are now looking for a quick solution to keep their submissions compliant.

At CoreFiling, it’s our business to keep you compliant – that’s why we are proud to announce that we are offering a free trial to our cloud-based regulatory filing platform, Seahorse®. The successor to T4U.

This free trial gives you the opportunity to create one complete filing to submit to a regulator – and even better, users will have three months to explore the software before submitting their filing. Here are just some of the ways in which Seahorse® can help your organisation:

The Benefits

  • Seahorse® lets you create fast, error-free XBRL filings. Unlike T4U, its data rendering is XBRL-based, so the reports you send will never have data conversion errors or approximations. The data is 100% accurate every time.
  • Seahorse® is hosted in the cloud. Its architecture lets you update taxonomies instantly, with no tedious installations. You can create and view your filings anywhere, any time.
  • Seahorse® allows you to easily create XBRL filings in the familiar environment of Microsoft Excel.

How do I sign up?

Trial access is available to anyone. To claim your trial, simply visit our website and fill out the sign up form.

The count-down to Solvency II Pillar 3 reporting – 4

How do I report to my NCA?

Although it remains at the discretion of the individual NCA, many regulated firms will find that they must now submit their quantitative reports in XBRL, which may be an unfamiliar format presenting a new set of challenges, particularly since there is now so much more data to be handled (at a recent conference estimates were quoted at over 10K data items for solo reporting, and 200K for group reporting during the preparatory phase, increasing to around 40K and 800K data items respectively when full scope reporting arrives in January 2016).

Integration or standalone?

How to handle the data is a key issue. Many insurers will have existing workflow and security processes in place, but must now integrate them with the less familiar requirements of XBRL preparation, validation and rendering, so both the IT department and the business will need to engage to ensure that the relevant data can be captured and turned into the required reports.

Decisions need to be made: whether to create a standalone environment or embed reporting into current architecture; whether to rely on process professionals to provide the specialist XBRL capabilities (which may be outside their core competence), or to seek help from a dedicated XBRL technology company.

Continue reading “The count-down to Solvency II Pillar 3 reporting – 4”